Anatomy of back of head and Neck

The neck begins at the base of the skull and through a series of seven vertebral segments connects to the thoracic spine (the upper back). With its complex and intricate construct, and the many stresses and forces that can be placed on it through a trauma or even just daily activities, the cervical spine is at risk for developing a number of painful conditions.

This article explores how the neck functions and how spinal anatomy relates to common causes of cervical neck pain, a stiff neck, arm pain, and other symptoms of cervical spine disorders.

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The cervical spine performs several crucial roles, including:

  • Housing and protecting the spinal cord. A bundle of nerves that extends from the brain and runs through the cervical spine and thoracic spine (upper and middle back) prior to ending just before the lumbar spine (lower back), the spinal cord relays messages from the brain to the rest of the body.
  • Supporting the head and its movement. The cervical spine literally shoulders a big load, as the head weighs on average between 10 and 13 pounds. In addition to supporting the head, the cervical spine allows for the head's flexibility, including rotational, forward/back and side bending motions.
  • Facilitating flow of blood to the brain. Vertebral openings (vertebral foramen) in the cervical spine provide a passageway for vertebral arteries to pass and ensure proper blood flow to the brain. These openings are present only in the vertebrae of the cervical spine.

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Q&A

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What would happen if humans could use the whole amount of their brains And if we didnt die in the proccess would we be able to like make things move with out touching it

The tale that humans do not use the whole of the brains was started by Dale Carnegie author of "How to Win Friends and Influence People" in order to strengthen his case.
There is plenty of evidence that humans use the whole of their brains, just not all at the same time. To do so would probably cause us to drop dead instantly from cross-interference of brain function. A massive stroke.

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