Human brain Eye of Horus

Horus was the ancient Egyptian sky god who was usually depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine falcon. His right eye was associated with the sun Ra. The eye symbol represents the marking around the eye of the falcon, including the “teardrop” marking sometimes found below the eye. The

In one myth, when Set and Horus were fighting for the throne after Osiris’s death, Set gouged out Horus’s left eye. The majority of the eye was restored by either Hathor or Thoth (with the last portion possibly being supplied magically). When Horus’s eye was recovered, he offered it to his father, Osiris, in hopes of restoring his life. Hence, the eye of Horus was often used to symbolise sacrifice, healing, restoration, and protection

There are seven different hieroglyphs used to represent the eye, most commonly “ir.t” in Egyptian, which also has the meaning “to make or do” or “one who does”.[5] In Egyptian myth the eye was not the passive organ of sight but more an agent of action, protection or wrath.

Mathematics

In Ancient Egyptian most fractions were written as the sum of two or more unit fractions (a fraction with 1 as the numerator), with scribes possessing tables of answers (see Rhind Mathematical Papyrus 2/n table). Thus instead of 3/4, one would write 1/2 + 1/4.

Arithmetic values represented by parts of the Eye of Horu

Fractions drawn as portions of a square.

Further information: Egyptian fraction and 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/16 + · · ·

Different part of the Eye of Horus were used by the ancient Egyptians to represent one divided by the first six powers of two:[13]

The right side of the eye = 1/2

The pupil = 1/4

The eyebrow = 1/8

The left side of the eye = 1/16

The curved tail = 1/32

The teardrop = 1/64

The Rhind Mathematical Papyrus contains tables of ‘Horus Eye Fractions’.

In one myth, when Set and Horus were fighting for the throne after Osiris’s death, Set gouged out Horus’s left eye. The majority of the eye was restored by either Hathor or Thoth (with the last portion possibly being supplied magically). When Horus’s eye was recovered, he offered it to his father, Osiris, in hopes of restoring his life. Hence, the eye of Horus was often used to symbolise sacrifice, healing, restoration, and protection

An interpretation of the Milky Way was that it was the primal snake, Wadjet, the protector of Egypt. In this interpretation she was closely associated with Hathor and other early deities among the various aspects of the great mother goddess, including Mut and Naunet. The association with Hathor brought her son Horus into association also. The cult of Ra absorbed most of Horus’s traits and included the protective eye of Wadjet that had shown her association with Hathor.

When identified as the protector of Ra, who was also a sun deity associated with heat and fire, she was sometimes said to be able to send fire onto those who might attack, just as the cobra spits poison into the eyes of its enemies. In this role she was called the Lady of Flame.

Wadjet as Wadjet-Bast, depicted as the body of a woman with a lioness head, wearing the uraeus

She later became identified with the war goddess of Lower Egypt, Bast, who acted as another figure symbolic of the nation, consequently becoming Wadjet-Bast. In this role, since Bast was a lioness, Wadjet-Bast was often depicted with a lioness head.

After Lower Egypt had been conquered by Upper Egypt and they were unified, the lioness goddess of Upper Egypt, Sekhmet, was seen as the more powerful of the two warrior goddesses. It was Sekhmet who was seen as the Avenger of Wrongs, and the Scarlet Lady, a reference to blood, as the one with bloodlust. She is depicted with the solar disk and Wadjet, however.

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Q&A

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Six parts of the brain and their functions? | Yahoo Answers

They probably mean the frontal lobe, occipital lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe and cerebellum. The last is harder but may be the brain stem.
Functions vary very much, and are under constant discussion. Some indications, however, are:
Frontal lobe: character.
Occipital lobe: eyesight.
Parietal lobe: some parts of language.
Temporal lobe: short-term memory.
Cerebellum: motor-skills.
Brain stem: certain reflexes (breathing).
Hope this helps!

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